Lloyd’s Remembrance Day event marks 100th anniversary of end of World War I

Today, the underwriting room fell silent at 11.00 as the Lutine Bell was struck and two minutes silence was observed as part of the Lloyd’s annual Remembrance Day.

As the Lone Piper played, a Guard of Honour was formed. Royal Naval Reserves from HMS President on the left flank; F (Rifles) Company, Londons and G Company, 7 Rifles on the right; and the Queen’s Colour Squadron to the rear.

Mark Drummond-Brady, the Chairman of the Lloyd’s branch of the Royal British Legion recited moving words from “The Ode of Remembrance” before the Bell was rung and the Last Post sounded by buglers.

Lloyd's Remembrance Day ceremony

To mark 100 years since the end of World War I, thousands of poppies were dropped from high up within the Lloyd’s building, scattering among those gathered below.

Lloyd’s Chairman, Bruce Carnegie-Brown led the wreath-laying ceremony alongside Charles Bowman, the Lord Mayor of London; Mark Drummond-Brady; Deputy Elizabeth Rogula of the Lime Street Ward; Simon Beale, Chairman MS Amlin; James Kininmonth, Chairman Lloyd’s Patriotic Fund; Captain Ian McNaught of Trinity House; Captain Rudy Vandaele-Kennedy, F Company (Rifles) London Regiment; and Wing Commander Ashley Bennett, Royal Air Force.

Lloyd's Remembrance Day ceremony

Thousands of poppies were dropped from high up within the Lloyd’s building to mark 100 years since the end of World War I.

As is the tradition, London Army Cadets provided assistance for guests.

Following on from the success of last year, the ceremony was once again streamed live online, making it accessible to anyone, anywhere worldwide. Footage from the ceremony is available below.

Lloyd's Remembrance Day ceremony 2018

Lloyd's Remembrance Book

 

Lloyd's Remembrance Book

We remember those members of the Lloyd's community who lost their lives in the First World War

Download Lloyd's Remembrance Book

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