Lloyd's and World War 1

During WWI, everyone was called on to play their part in the war effort. Lloyd’s was no exception.

By June 1916, even before compulsory service was introduced, 2,485 men from Lloyd’s had undertaken military service. Many of those who could not take part in actual combat also relinquished their business duties in order to serve the country in other ways.

Despite the amount of men from Lloyd’s who had committed themselves to the war effort, business had to continue. This war saw the introduction of new weaponry and technology, such as submarines, which presented new challenges when assessing risks. Those who remained at Lloyd’s had to adapt and pull together to ensure the market continued as efficiently as ever.

Lloyd's contribution

Take a virtual tour of Lloyd's - picture of underwriting roomThe market’s strong connections with the Territorial Army meant that hundreds of underwriters, brokers, members and staff were mobilised within weeks of war being declared on 4 August 1914.

Lloyd's contribution to WW1

War in the air

Powered flight was in its infancy at the outbreak of the war and Lloyd’s only started insuring aircraft in 1911. Its first policies covered liability only as it was assumed that the flimsy planes would crash sooner rather than later.

War in the air

War at sea

The invention of the submarine and the propelled torpedo towards the end of the 19th century greatly increased the potential losses at sea and after 1898 war risks were no longer included automatically in marine insurance policies.

War at sea

Lloyd's War Memorial

Arch to commemorate those who died in the Great WarThe original Lloyd's War Memorial arch was designed by Sir Edwin Cooper and unveiled in 1922. Today the War Memorial is still part of Lloyd's building and are a tribute to every man and woman who contributed to the protection of Lloyd's and the surrounding areas during both the wars.

Lloyd's War Memorial arch

Celebrating innovation

 

325 years of Lloyd's: An Extraordinary History

Take a journey through Lloyd's extraordinary 325 year history. From sea vessels to space ships, body parts to natural catastrophes.